I’ll Make You Eat Those Words – Sonic Adventure 2 and the Translation Check

I’m sure some people might be wondering what exactly we do here at Renta!, so I thought I’d like to talk a bit about what it’s like to work here. As it turns out, it’s a bit more complicated than sitting around reading manga every day. Although, as you might be able to imagine, the conversations around the office do tend to be a bit geekier than most…

So what exactly is the process before the manga is released in English and everyone is happy reading their perfectly translated content? Well, as it turns out, it’s not as simple as running the original Japanese through the magic translation machine and getting a perfect English copy.

Of course, the first step is stripping the text and translating the Japanese into English. Depending on the size and content of the manga, this can be a time-consuming task on its own. A slice-of-life high school romance will naturally take less time to translate than a fantasy epic with lots of weird magic spells and fancy character and place names.

Once the manga is translated, that’s not the end for our lovely new English text. Here at Renta!, we are proud of the quality of our translations, so we always make sure to have translations looked at by another professional. While all of our translators are amazing, we don’t have any magical space employees at Renta! either, so of course there are always some spelling mistakes or strange grammar, as well as the occasional mistranslation. In fact, I might even go far as to say that the check is the most important part of the translation process!

Depending on the media, it’s not hard to tell when a translation doesn’t get the attention it deserves. Sometimes there’s a deadline that has to be made. Sometimes there’s an issue that’s out of the creators’ control. Whatever the reason, sometimes you get weird or interesting translations that probably should’ve been checked a bit better. And I think that was the case for a game I really enjoy, Sonic Adventure 2. For a game that was developed over a span of only 18 months, I think it turned out mostly pretty well! Except for some weird translation quirks that I think could have benefited from a bit more polish.

But you can always pet the chao.

While Sonic Adventure 2 is well-loved for its sometimes unnatural translation, it screams to me like something that was written in a hurry and not given the the developer’s full attention. Numerous fan-retranslation projects also exist because Sonic fans have proven time and time again that they’re nothing if not passionate about their favorite blue vaguely hedgehog-resembling speed demon.

The power of angry fans literally convinced SEGA not to use this disgusting two-eyeballed monstrosity months before its major release.

Whether it’s the overuse of stilted and kind of unnatural phrases like “Long time, no see!” or dialogue where two characters bizarrely cut each other off mid-insult despite the cutscene being timed and recorded for the English dub (?), there’s a few things that really make me wonder if SEGA simply didn’t have enough time to send the text off to get that extra spit-shine.

At Renta!, we all believe in delivering the absolute best translation possible, and that’s why we really take the time and effort to deliver truly polished products to our readers. Sometimes this means that highly requested series don’t quite make it out in English at Sonic speeds, but rest assured we’re doing everything in our ultimate power to make sure English readers are as happy and fulfilled as people reading in the original Japanese. Our goal is to give you your money’s worth!

Interview with Owal-Sensei (Translation)

To celebrate the release of “Our House Love Trouble” and the accompanying “drama CD”, Marine Entertainment has shared a special follow-up interview with Owal-Sensei.

In it, Owal-Sensei discusses character names, her favorite type of characters to draw, and how they came up with some of the more shockingly sexy and fun moments in the bedroom scenes for “Our House Love Trouble” (Available now in English at Renta! Manga Store ❤ )

I took a moment this weekend to give it a quickie translation from Japanese to English. I hope you find it as interesting as I did! 

To celebrate the release of “Our House Love Trouble” and the accompanying “drama CD”, Marine Entertainment has shared a special follow-up interview with Owal-Sensei.

 

In it, Owal-Sensei discusses character names, her favorite type of characters to draw, and how they came up with some of the more shockingly sexy and fun moments in the bedroom scenes for “Our House Love Trouble” Available now in English at Renta! Manga Store ❤

 

I took a moment this weekend to give it a quickie translation from Japanese to English. I hope you find it as interesting as I did! 

 

 

★☆★☆★☆★☆★☆★☆★☆★☆★
■Do you find it difficult to decide on character names?
  What is your thought process when coming up with names?

 

Deciding on character names is one of my favorite things! The only problem is, it’s really hard for me to come up with them lol.

 

With Our House, Nonohiko was the first character to receive a name.

 

I think names that have two repeating syllables are cute, and was considering a 4-syllable name for the main uke, and so that’s how 『のの彦』 Nonohiko got his name.

 

I wanted to give all the seme characters 1-kanji names across the board, and so that’s how I decided on 『響・要・馨』 Hibiki, Kaname, and Kaoru. Only later when I was writing notes on the manuscript did I realize that the kanji for Hibiki and Kaoru’s names look really similar, so when I had to write really small it caused a lot of confusion later on lol.

 

―――Were there any characters you had difficulty naming?

 

I think it’s difficult to decide on names for all my characters, but Hibiki was the most challenging this time.

 

I had already decided to make Nonohiko’s full name “Nonohiko Nojima”, so I thought I’d make Hibiki’s last name “Minami” so that when you put them together it’d read “Minami no Shima” (which means Southern Islands – Sarah).

 

But then I wanted Hibiki to have a name that fit better with his “Super Darling” character type (a dashing, handsome, confident, warm, manly man who openly loves and accepts his uke, usually tall, educated, and rich), so I ended up giving him the name “Hibiki Kaidou”. (Ocean Way)

 

Sometimes I also decide on a theme and give characters names accordingly.

 

In Hangout Crisis, I decided to give everyone “flower” last names, which is how I came up with 『椿』Tsubaki (camellia) and 『桜井』Sakurai (cherry-blossom well)!

 

It makes me really happy when people remember my characters’ names out of all the many characters out there.

 

 

 

■What kind of character personalities do you like the most?

 

I love characters who are a pleasure to tease!

 

When I’m drawing ukes, in my mind I’m usually biting my lip thinking “Ah, I want to tease him so bad!” I’m not saying I don’t genuinely like the uke characters, but I think I have a tendency to fall into the seme’s emotional point of view lol.

 

Actually, this time I packed a ton of my favorite character personality traits into Nonohiko!

 

A big chest (lit. oppai, lol), an almost unconditionally accepting and gentle heart, and the type that’ll wrap you up in warm comfort when you need it.

 

It’s the type of guy you just wanna trick/bully/fool/tease. Naturally, the Super Darling will want to spoil and take care of him, try to make him jealous, etc… I tried to stuff it full of that flavor of romance lol.

 

That’s another thing that blows me away in the audio-drama adaptation for this manga. No matter how many times I listen to it, my heart is purified every single time by how accurately they portrayed this lol.

 

In all the comments and reviews, I was also really moved by everyone who wrote in saying how much they adored Nonohiko.

 

I think I have my editor to thank for making him such a beloved character, since they’re the one who gave me the suggestion “Make him dumber.” If I’d written him a little smarter, I don’t think it would have turned out quite the same lol. The story depends on his slightly ditsy, warm fuzzy kind of “wait, what?” clueless personality lol.

 

■When you’re creating manga, what matters to you the most?

 

It’s gotta be “sexy, easy on the eyes, and engaging/interesting/funny”!

 

―――In all the feedback from questionnaires, the fans have spoken, and they all agree that Owal-Sensei’s fetish and action in the bedroom scenes deserve only the highest of praise!!

 

I’m so happy to hear that. Thank you so much!!

 

My editor gives me incredibly great ideas and suggestions. When we discuss concepts and stories together, they’ll just casually drop the best ideas like a bomb, no hesitation at all lol.

 

That’s how we ended up with Nonohiko squatting over Hibiki’s face on the hotel bed.

 

Not to mention the “How about a shoulder-blade-job?” suggestion… that idea was so good, we got a little over-excited lol.

 

We went from starting with Hibiki making a sudden move to rub himself between Nonohiko’s shoulder blades, all the way to Nonohiko fwipping his face around to get an eye-full (so to speak lol).

 

During that conversation it was like the whole scene was crystal clear in my mind. Then when actually drawing that scene, it was so much fun. I was also really happy when I saw that they included that scene on the back of the book’s “obi”, too.

 

I also try to be really careful about dividing up the content in each panel. I say that but then I have a bad habit of cramming as much as I can into one page, too lol.

 

I try to fill each and every panel with at least one thing that will catch the reader’s eye. It would make me happy if when someone flips through and sees something interesting, they then flip back to page one to enjoy the story from the beginning.

 

―――Thank you very much!

 

-Special Thanks to Marine Entertainment and Owal-Sensei. Please visit their website at the link above and check out the English translation of Our House Love Trouble, available now. ❤

 

our-house-cover

The Difference Between Good Enough and Good

I feel like translation is quite subjective, with no “perfect” translation out there.

Manga is unique because it’s a combination of written and spoken English, but almost always focuses on conversation above all other types of language.

Localization in particular can make the difference between a translation that is, technically speaking, “correct”… and a translation that FEELS right.

Today I was thrown off by a perfectly correct translation of  [ 人間 健康が一番 / ningen — kenkou ga ichiban ] which was a piece of some thought-dialog in a manga I was browsing through.

It was submitted as “Health is the most important thing for humans.”

While there is nothing grammatically inappropriate here and it is, arguably, natural speech in English, I couldn’t help but think “Oh, but not for apes or cats.”

The way we throw words together in normal conversations happens with very little conscious thought at all, but we still manage to express much more than what is being said by the way we choose to phrase our words.

I know it says ningen (humans) in Japanese, but saying it in English adds unnecessary emphasis, and makes it feel slightly off, even though nothing is technically wrong.

Maybe it’s the cold medicine I’m taking, or maybe I just have special issues, but I find that listening to the voices in your head is the best way to get a natural translation out of something that feels weird when you can’t quite put your finger on WHY it feels weird.

The voices in my head told me to write it as:

“Nothing is more important than your health.”

Assuming, of course, that the person reading that inner thought dialog is a human. But the nice thing about this is that it works for other species, too. Even aliens will not feel left out now.

Isn’t that nice?

It feels right to me.

I also feel guilty for not taking better care of my health now. Oops.

 

This blog was brought to you by cold medicine, ecchi localization contemplations, and my sincere apologies for not updating the blog more often recently. I’ve been out of the office a lot and I’m catching up on my to do list of delicious manga for your reading pleasure, so hopefully things will settle down soon and I’ll update you with all the wonderful things that have been happening around here.

“Older-Guy Uke Fetish” – Presented by Nerima zim

Sometimes artists or other people on twitter will open up a “question box” feature through a third-party app where you can submit any question you want, and if they feel like it, they will answer!

Usually yaoi/BL manga artists are incredibly sweet, and will take the time to answer as many questions as they can.

I happened to know that Nerima zim, author of “I Never Taught You That!”, “Listen To Your Teacher!”, and “My Hopeless Dreamer”, has a certain predilection for creating stories with older men as the UKE in all of their manga.

Several months ago I asked them on Twitter, “Uh… I’m just taking a wild guess, but… Sensei do you have an “older guy fetish?”” and their reply to me was an enthusiastic “YES!”

I knew it…

Equipped with that knowledge, I noticed Nerima zim accepting questions on Twitter today, and couldn’t resist poking a stick at that land-mine:

Sarah:

Hello Sensei!
I have a question regarding your “older-man fetish.” Could you explain the attraction and appeal of “older men” to people who have not yet reached enlightenment?

Not only did they answer me in great detail, they also got so excited that Twitter’s character count limit got in the way, uh, more than once. That did not stop Nerima Sensei, though.

They were so adorable and passionate about older-men uke that I asked permission to loosely translate and share their answers with you on this blog, so here you go!

Nerima zim:

(First Tweet)
Of course! Older uke men are so cute when they let their guard down because the LAST thing they’d ever expect is that another guy would be looking at them romantically or sexually. I love it when an older, wiser man (who long ago grew past the stage of life where young men typically strut their stuff trying to be a hot shot etc…) starts to warm up to the affections of a younger man, only to come face to face with the overflowing hot desire of a young man’s lust!!

(Second Tweet)
Oh no! 100 characters is not enough!💦 I also love it when an older guy who’s settled down after going through all the ups and downs of an adult life has to confront the (what he thought was an extremely unlikely) idea that he’d be starting a new romance at what he considers to be so late in life🧔🏻💦 That kind of story development is the BEST! Naturally they’d be shocked that someone their age would end up an uke to a younger guy! 😭💦 And when the seme treats him right, ’cause he’s so important to him!🤦‍♀️💦

(Third Tweet)
I’d kill to interview that older guy and ask how it felt when he realized that an ambitious, lust-filled younger guy was desperately hunting him down. Like, “Having once been a robust young man yourself, what’s it like now that all those hormones and affections of a younger stud are honed in and locked on to YOU?” Please, older men! Tell me! I need to know!!😭💦 So yeah, I adore the type of older man who can appreciate and accept those feelings.🤦‍♀️💦 What a blessing/gem/rare gift/precious thing…

(Fourth Tweet)

And! And!! 🤗💕It makes me sooo happy when the older guy is like “How could you fall in love with an old fart like me? Poor thing! What a pitiful guy!” 😢💦 But then inwardly he’s all secretly feeling like hot shit because he’s got a gorgeous guy so many years younger than him for a boyfriend. It’s so fun to see them getting into it( ◜௰◝و(و

~~~~~

So what do you think? See what I mean about a land-mine? Sensei was sooo cute answering my question, and the passion they feel for “Ossan” (older men) uke is INTENSE! and we love it! ❤

We currently have three manga titles from Nerima zim Sensei on Renta! in English (with more on the way!), so if you wanna see what all the hot fuss is about, check them out!

They ALL have older-men uke in them! hahaha! ❤


My Hopeless Dreamer

My Hopeless Dreamer

Story: Shinobu Aizawa is already in his forties, but he works part-time as a security guard while pursuing his dream of becoming an archaeologist. One day, he is sent to work security at a party venue and the guy he tries to hold down for making a fuss turns out to be Aldo, the very prince who organized the party. Before Shinobu has a chance to understand what’s going on, he’s being dragged into the center of the room and introduced as the prince’s fiance! This is a romantic love story between a bold and brazen prince and a middle-aged dreamer!


I Never Taught You That!

I Never Taught You That

Story: Masaki Tsuji is a divorced high school teacher in his early 30s. Lately, he’s been running into a groper on his train ride to work. At first, he thought it was a mistake, but once the hand reaches around the front, things start to escalate! Then a voice whispers, “You’re cute, Mr. Tsuji.” He can’t stop thinking about the perpetrator all the way to school. When Sohta, a student who usually gets good grades, hands in a blank test sheet, Masaki calls him in for a talk. They meet after school, and once Sohta confirms that they’re alone, he goes in for a kiss! This is a secret school love story between a handsome student and his 30-something teacher!


Listen To Your Teacher!

Listen To Your Teacher

Story: Masaki Tsuji’s a 30-something year old high school teacher as sincere as they come. His student, Sohta Izumi, is in love with him. Through many twists and turns, Sohta’s earnest feelings eventually swayed Masaki and the two are now in a romantic relationship. Sohta’s dating Masaki, something he thought he only could’ve dreamed of. His fantasies are reigned in by Masaki, who forbids any kind of hanky-panky at school and sex until graduation! Forced to hold back right after attaining his love, Sohta’s jealousy builds day by day. Just then, Mr. Noda, the new school nurse, catches on to their relationship…
This is the sequel to the popular “I Never Taught You That!”

Please try these out, and enjoy! Also, you can follow Nerima zim’s Twitter account (in Japanese) at @nerima_zim to keep an eye on this hard-working, amazingly talented Sensei I adore.

 


 

PS: Coming soon to Renta! in 2018, 『Kore Mo O-Shigoto Desu!』featuring, you guessed it, a sweet (and hot) relationship between an older uke and a younger man! Check it out in the original Japanese at the link provided, or wait ever-so-patiently just a LITTLE longer and it’ll be in English soon! ❤

Kore mo Oshigoto Desu.PNG

One Shot: My Younger Boyfriend’s an Ice Prince

As an avid Yaoi/BL reader, I feel like I have grown accustomed to the satisfaction of reading a story from start to finish in 4-6 chapters, a.k.a. a one-volume by the book kind of thing.

I love this length of story because it is just long enough to get in good character growth while still giving you the satisfaction of an amazing ending.

SOME genres keep you hanging forever with eternal cliffhangers and flashbacks and never-ending drama. I’m looking at YOU, Shojo manga and JUMP series like Naruto and Bleach. PLEASE just let Skip Beat end. They need to be together already! I would like to finish this story before I die. Thank you.

However!

One-Shots are really great sometimes, too. This term refers to the type of story that most commonly wraps everything up in a nice bow within one chapter.

(Though sometimes there will be a part-one or part-two. Lots of new yaoi artists will start by drawing a series of one-shots and then their work gets compiled into a by-the-book volume which we call an Anthology, and there are lots of those on our site, too!)

Today I wanted to introduce a new one-shot that just came out this week on 8/14, called “My Younger Boyfriend is an Ice Prince” (Toshishita Kareshi wa Reikoku Ouji) by tare.

It was my pleasure to edit this! I loved it.

The art is both cute and gorgeous and the characters are adorable… until they’re not *smirk*…

My Younger Boyfriend's an Ice Prince.PNG

We get to read this 37-page manga from Shuya’s perspective. From the very outset, we learn that he’s dating Kyo, a gorgeous celebrity, and that they’re currently living together. However, it would seem they haven’t “gone all the way” so it’s hard to tell at first glance who will be doing what in the bedroom later on.

Kyo’s public persona is that of a dark and handsome hottie with the aura of an “Ice Prince.” Only Shuya knows Kyo’s real personality is a fluffy cutie whose smile could warm the room.

At least… that’s what he thinks.

Shuya gets forced into going to a mixer (Goukon “group date”) and gets fairly wasted there.

This seems to happen a lot in manga! Please don’t try this at home. We all know where it leads so I hope you brought condoms. Unless that is your intention in which case, good luck but please drink responsibly. : )

When Shuya’s friend borrows his phone and dial’s Kyo to come pick him up, he’s so alarmed that he shows up like a Knight in Shining Armor and takes him home.

But something about Kyo’s personality is different…

It could be the ice-cold sparkle in his eyes that sends chills down Shuya’s spine…

Or maybe the aggressive way he pushes Shuya down?

Which personality is the REAL Kyo?? Shuya… might be surprised. But you? I hope you will be as pleased as I was.

Get a glass of water ready before you read this one because it will make you thirsty.

The only downside to one-shots is that when they’re this good, it leaves you wanting more!

Interview with a Vampire Editor

Recently someone came to me privately with some very thoughtful questions about my job because they were considering their own future possibilities and wanted an inside look.

うそ~ I’m not actually a vampire. I’m just sensitive to sunlight…

Recently someone came to me privately with some very thoughtful questions about my job because they were considering their own future possibilities and wanted an inside look.

I thought many other aspiring manga lovers and fellow nerds would also be interested in this kind of topic, so I asked if it would be okay to share my comments here as well.

Enjoy!


“Was it difficult to enter your position with Renta in Tokyo?– do they only hire locally?”

It was a little difficult, but only because the hiring process was very thorough/intensive with multiple interviews and tests. I’ve been living in Japan for some time now and had the appropriate work visa and relevant university degree/work experience, but I think my love for art, language, and manga made me a great candidate for the position! I’m positive they didn’t know I would be so talkative or else they would have reconsidered… (*shared working space)

My position in the Tokyo office is a sei-sha-in (full time) contract, and my main job is to edit, check, and finalize the manga’s translation and lettering/layout quality for its final review before going on sale on the site.

We have a network of freelancers and companies who work with us to do translation and lettering, and it goes through several checks before publication.

Freelance translators, translation checkers, and letterers are often hired locally in Japan, but applicants for freelance-type positions do not necessarily need to live in Japan. Full time Renta! employees do, because as you have rightly guessed, I do a lot more than just editing (I also handle most online social media, marketing, projects for conventions, etc…) but not everyone’s job requires them to physically be in Tokyo or even Japan. In fact, as we continue to grow, the office we have in San Francisco will take on a bigger role in our activities, too.

“Do you find your day-to-day job challenging, grueling, fun? It seems that you handle both translating/editing as well as PR work, that’s quite a lot!”

Oh goodness. hmm. Incredibly fun and incredibly stressful. Trying to edit something to perfection takes a lot of mental energy! However, this is also a job where creativity is essential, and I never get bored because each page is different.

Language and translation has always been a passion of mine, and linguistics was my major in university. Art has ALSO been a passion of mine that I’ve kept up as a hobby my whole life. So to get to do a job where both art and language/writing are needed feels just perfect for me.

As I already mentioned, I do have to do more than just editing as part of my full-time position here. However, they also don’t force me to do anything I’m terrible at! We’re lucky to have a really great boss in the international department that runs the English site, and he encourages us to take initiatives on projects we’re excited about.

For me, that includes SNS and PR-adjacent stuff. I’m a little bit uhhhh… impulsive? lol. So I can get away with speaking from a “human” opinion/standpoint here on this blog and the twitter account for Yaoi that I have thoroughly infiltrated and taken over, and I love that it allows me to connect with other BL fans online.

Overall, we (fujoshi & fudanshi & pervs who love manga) are an awesome community, and I’d like to be able to pull more people together. As you know, most people get introduced to BL either by accident or by introduction via a friend! Let’s indoctrinate… I mean… introduce more people to Yaoi!! What a weird typo.

“I understand that to the translating/editing industry, there are some major problems such as piracy. Are there any other wide-reaching issues that you’ve come across?”

Piracy is an issue both in native Japanese and in the world of translation. I’ve spoken about it recently in this letter to Scanlation groups that was REALLY well received. (Bless the kind people out there who understand.) Chase also wrote about piracy in more depth here on this blog.

Other issues that come quickly to mind… would probably include cultural attitudes on sexuality.

As an issue, this is extremely difficult to discuss openly because we are all human, and most people struggle to set their own experience and beliefs to the side to try to see things from an unfamiliar or even opposite perspective. This is true not only when it comes to such a personal and sensitive topic, but in this case they also have to see past the fact that this content comes from a different culture entirely, so even things that SEEM like they would be universal, often aren’t.

I would like more English-speaking women (and men) to enjoy these types of genres out of Japan (awesome eroi ones) and gain a better understanding of their own sexuality without constantly feeling guilt, shame, and the need to repress everything always all the time, but unfortunately due to the nature of the subject, it can be very challenging to address.

As an industry, I think another issue we need to face is the growing desire of customers to have everything available both digitally and in print as soon as it is published vs. the desperate publishers trying to keep print sales up, too. This can make them hesitant to jump on the digital bandwagon. Yet, we book lovers want it both ways. We’re definitely not willing to give up paper printed books altogether, so finding a way to make everyone happy and still get as much content into English as possible 1) while still making the artists and publishers money 2) AND giving the English-speaking world the content they want can be challenging!

The last thing that occurred to me as far as issues in the industry go is that sometimes the more popular a manga is, the less likely it is to sell official and licensed copies because hardcore fans keep one eye on the Japanese releases, getting fan-translated editions way before it’s licensed in English (which is understandable, we’re a very thirsty impatient group!).

When the manga does finally become available, only obsessed fans buy it, and regular/casual fans do not.

Renta! has been getting more and more popular big-name titles as we grow, but I think one of the reasons we’ve been so successful is that we’ve been offering some really great titles that are actually quite nice and high quality, but that have been falling under the radar of the larger international community compared to huge, famous titles getting all the attention, so illegal translations aren’t available and people are more willing to try them out because they look good (and they ARE good!). Also, we publish so much contemporary manga that our releases are often too new to even be registered in the manga updates database by fans yet.

Again, sometimes, but not always, when we release a title from some of the more popular artists such as Tomo Kurahashi or Harada for instance, it’s difficult to get people who are already fans to buy something they’ve already read and have access to. Loyal and hardcore fans will buy them, but casual manga fans face an emotional barrier of being asked to pay for something they’ve already read, EVEN IF it is professional quality and will support the artist financially.

This has been my experience so far.

“Do you feel that despite these issues, your job is still enjoyable and viable, and you’re able to support yourself (both emotionally as well as financially)?”

I must admit, I have to read a lot of porny manga Monday through Friday, eight hours a day plus overtime, and sometimes that can be exhausting lol. It can also be fun though, and the other full-time editors I work with are amazing. We all emotionally-cope together.

(I bought a “stress banana” which we keep on our desks when we need an outlet. It stretches and twists and wobbles. It’s amazing. Everyone should have a stress banana.)

IMG_4404

As editors, we’re all perfectionist, perverted otaku who just want to get things right. But, when your job is to find and correct mistakes, it comes with the downside of having to find and correct mistakes all the time. Some of them seem unbelievable or unforgivable. However, we all make mistakes! Still…

Asking our computer screen daily “WHY ARE YOU LIKE THIS!?” is a common occurrence. We all vent but we all love our jobs and support each other! I’m really, really glad that I work with this group of amazing people.

To answer the last part, as I mentioned in the letter to scanlation groups, financially speaking, we are but one department/branch that’s part of a larger Japanese company with lots of bureaucracy and typical office life that comes with the job, so I can’t say that we do it for the money. We do it for love.

As long as I can spend all my extra money on new manga, I’m happy.

In Conclusion

I think it’s amazing that you’re interested in Japanese culture and are considering finding your way into a position that lets you share that with other people. I love that part about my job, too.

It’s true you can’t support yourself on what you love if you treat it like a hobby, but you’d be surprised if you take a look around and see what opportunities are out there.

I never expected to work with manga, never ever. But the right opportunity came at the right time and I hit apply SO fast. I knew that this was the job I wanted, and it felt right.

I have also been living in Japan for 10 years now, so it took lots of experience to get my Japanese and writing experience up to this level.

To be honest, I wasn’t even reading manga 10 years ago and never would have expected to end up where I am now. (I taught at an Eikaiwa my first year, and have done various teaching jobs since then. I was a writer’s assistant for a Japanese author in my previous job. Then life took some interesting turns. muehehe.)

My advice would be to grab onto whatever makes you curious or excited NOW, and it will lead you to something different that you love down the road.

Don’t overthink it, just follow your curiosity! : )